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HEALTH STATUS - Lung & Breast Cancer
Heart Disease & Cancer Death Rates  |  Lung & Breast Cancer  |  
Leading Causes of Death
Lung Cancer: Lung cancer was the leading cause of death among all types of cancer in Hawai'i and the nation in 2006. The United States has experienced a 12.6 percent drop in lung cancer death rates since 1990 while Hawai'i's cancer rate has declined 4.3 percent. While Hawai'i's death rate has declined during 1990's, recent years show an upward trend in lung cancer mortality. 

Breast Cancer: Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among women. Overall, Hawai'i's breast cancer deaths have remained near or below the "Healthy People 2020" objective since 1993, and well below U.S. rates. Rates for the counties generally fluctuate greatly due to the small total number of deaths due to breast cancer. When breast cancer death rates for all Neighbor Island counties are compared to Honolulu, the rates are consistently higher. The Neighbor Island breast cancer death rate decreased between 1998-2000 and 2002-2004, but has increased in recent years. Currently both Honolulu and Neighbor Island breast cancer death rates are similar or better than the "Healthy People 2010" objective.

Reducing Cancer Deaths: Lung cancer death rates can be reduced by adopting a healthier lifestyle. Smoking is the most important risk factor for lung cancer, responsible for about 87 percent of all lung cancer deaths.1 Other risk factors include occupational exposures (e.g., asbestos) and indoor and outdoor air pollution (e.g., radon and environmental tobacco smoke). After 10 years of abstinence, smoking cessation reduces the risk of lung cancer to 30 to 50 percent of that of continuing smokers.2 Breast cancer deaths may be prevented through earlier detection from regular mammography screening and breast examinations.

Cancer Deaths and Early Detection: The five-year relative survival rate for all cancers diagnosed between 2002 and 2008 is 68 percent, up from 49 percent in the 1975-1977 period, due in part to progress in early detection and improved or new treatments. Rates vary greatly by cancer type and stage at diagnosis.3 The earlier cancer is detected and treated, the greater the chances of survival. People whose cancer was first diagnosed at Stage IV were 68 times more likely to die than those whose cancers were diagnosed at Stage 0, based on five-year survival rates from the 1999-2005 period.


Related Topics
Health Status Indicator
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Compare Health Data
> Lung Cancer Death Rate, Hawai`i vs. U.S.
> Lung Cancer Death Rate, by County
> Breast Cancer Death Rate, Hawai`i vs. U.S.
> Breast Cancer Death Rate, by County
> Cancer Death Rate, by Stage at Diagnosis, Hawai`i
  Click here to view graphs
Source: Hawai`i State Department of Health, Office of Health Status Monitoring, Vital Statistics Records.; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics Reports.
Note: All U.S. rates and Hawai`i rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population. Because the method of coding causes of death changed in 1999, the data from 1990-1998 are not comparable to data from 1999-present.
Source: Hawai`i State Department of Health, Office of Health Status Monitoring, Vital Statistics Records.
Note: All U.S. rates and Hawai`i rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population. Because the method of coding causes of death changed in 1999, the data from 1990-1998 are not comparable to data from 1999-present.
Source: Hawai`i State Department of Health, Office of Health Status Monitoring, Vital Statistics Records.; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics Reports.
Note: All U.S. rates and Hawai`i rates prior to 2002 are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population. Hawai`i 2002-2003 rates are age-adjusted to the estimated 2002 U.S. Census population. Because the method of coding causes of death changed in 1999, the data from 1990-1998 are not comparable to data from 1999-2003.
Source: Hawai`i State Department of Health, Office of Health Status Monitoring, Vital Statistics Records.
Note: Rates prior to 2002 are age-adjusted to the year 2000 U.S. standard population. 2002-2003 rates are age-adjusted to the estimated 2002 U.S. Census population. Because the method of coding causes of death changed in 1999, the data from 1990-1998 are not comparable to data from 1999-2003. Counties were combined because the number of deaths was too small to age-adjust
Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program, SEER*Stat Database: Incidence - SEER 9 Regs Public-Use, National Cancer Institute, DCCPS, Surveillance Research Program, Cancer Statistics Branch.
Note: Rates are age-adjusted to the year 2000 U.S. standard population.